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Unusual Underhammer Belgium Pistol

This is clearly a high quality made pistol.
The top is stamped Brevet d'invention sans gar'te du Gouv.t which basically means invention without a patent.
It is quite a hand cannon and there is an attachment point for a shoulder stock which could have been screwed in. This pistol was made in circa 1840 .

Code: 50626

Reserved


Rare Colt 3rd Model London Dragoon

This is an interesting and scarce Colt Dragoon with British Proofs that was assembled in Colt's London factory in 1853 and one of only 700 such examples. The story behind the London Dragoon is that Mr Dennet the manager or agent at Colt's Pall Mall office received an enquiry for .44 calibre revolvers and as they were not in production at that time in England, 700 partly made revolvers were quickly shipped in parts and finished and proofed in London. Only 500 were eventually sold and when Colt closed the factory ( after being discovered colluding with the Russians during the Crimean War!! ) the remaining 200 were sent back to the USA to be sold.
This is a 3rd model Dragoon and a decent example as can be seen from the photographs and has a good bore, distinct address and proof marks and is mechanically sound.
The serial number 437 is stamped on the frame, arbor, butt, cylinder and loading lever.
A scarce Dragoon!

Code: 50625

8750.00 GBP


Shortlist item
Remington Vest Pocket Pistol Circa 1870

This rare little Remington vest pistol was invented by William H Elliot and is alternatively known as an Elliot's pattern or saw handle pistol because of the shape of the butt.
The pistols were made in blued, silver or nickel finishes.
The pistol is unusual insofar as the hammer obdurates the breech when it falls and you drop down a gate to load it. You can see the beginnings of the famous Remington breech block action emerging in this diminutive pistol.
Although the handle looks uncomfortable it is actually a very comfortable pistol to hold and the ergonomics are superb.
Between 1865 and 1888 less than 20,000 of these pistols were made.
The pistol is stamped with the makers name and patent date on top of the breech.
This particular pistol is in 41 rim fire calibre and recent research has shown that this had formidable stopping power at close range.
The actions is tight and as it should be.
All in all a scarce, if not rare little pistol that would make a good addition to a Derringer collection.

Code: 50624

Reserved


Remington Model 1888 Deringer

The Remington Model 95 is a double-barrel pocket pistol commonly recognised as a derringer. The design was little changed during a production run of nearly 70 years through several financial reorganisations of the manufacturer causing repeating serial number sequences. Guns were offered with engraving or plain blued or nickel-plated finish with grips of metal, walnut, rosewood, hard rubber, ivory or pearl. The earliest production had no extractors and have E. REMINGTON & SONS, ILION, N.Y. stamped on the right side of the barrel and ELLIOT'S PATENT DEC. 12, 1865 stamped on the left side of the barrel. These inscriptions were swapped to opposite sides of the barrel when extractors were added in 1869. In 1880, the inscription was changed to E. REMINGTON & SONS, ILION, N.Y. ELLIOT'S PATENT DEC. 12th 1865,and placed atop the barrel rib. The barrel rib top inscription changed to REMINGTON ARMS CO. ILION N.Y. in 1888 and again to REMINGTON ARMS U.M.C. CO. ILION, N.Y.in 1910
This particular example is the pattern introduced in 1888 identified by the inscription on the top rib. This is a very good example and lacks the inherent faults often seen which is cracked and repaired hinges which this example does not suffer from.
This is a blued pistol that has mellowed to a nice dark plum patina as can be seen and with excellent grips. There appears to be more nickel plated pistols extant than blued pistols.

A very attractive and handsome looking example of an iconic gun reputed to be favoured by gamblers and “loose” women as they are very easily concealed.

Code: 50622

1100.00 GBP


Shortlist item
Good Colt New Line Revolver Ist year of manufacture 1873.

This is a very good Colt new line revolver in 32 rimfire calibre. This was Colt’s answer to the plethora of small cheap revolvers flooding the USA market in the 1870’s.
This particular revolver was made in 1873 which was the first year of manufacture as evidenced by its serial number.
This scarce revolver has varnished rosewood grips and is mechanically sound and works as it should. The action is tight and it holds full and half cock and disassembles easily. The original blue finish has faded to an even dark patina. The makers name is stamped on the barrel.
These little revolvers evolved as secondary sidearms that could be easily hidden in pockets to circumnavigate common firearms laws that prohibited the carrying of full-sized weapons into towns.
This is an interesting piece of Wild West History.

Code: 50621

1200.00 GBP


Shortlist item
Californian Gold Rush Bowie Knife

This Bowie knife has an overall length of 12" and a blade length of 7.5".

Knife has excellent etching which reads " Californians ask for nothing but for what is right and submit to nothing that is wrong"
Also " I can dig Gold from Quarts" and "The Californian Bowie Knife". The knife is stamped with the makers name and VR with a crown circa 1845 -1855.
Ivory handle with later sheath, a rare blade and highly sought after.

Code: 50156

Price
on
Request


Interesting Copy of Volcanic pistol.

Now this is an interesting piece and is a copy of a Volcanic pistol manufactured for collectors in the past purely for display. The purpose of the pistol is to illustrate the toggle loading mechanism which works and was the mechanism that evolved into the famous Winchester underlever rifle. This is purely for display and is non- functioning. The loading lever moves the toggle mechanism as it should, and you can see how the tubular spring magazine works and eventually evolved into the Winchester tube magazine feed and of course that of other rifles and carbines.
This is a solid piece and heavy pistol that must have taken a huge amount of time to manufacture. The top strap is crudely stamped with the New Haven Arms Company and the patent date.
The Volcanic Repeating Arms Company was an American company formed in 1855 by partners Horace Smith and Daniel B. Wesson to develop Walter Hunt's Rocket Ball ammunition and lever action mechanism. Volcanic made an improved version of the Rocket Ball ammunition, and a carbine and pistol version of the lever action gun to fire it. While the Volcanic Repeating Arms Company was short-lived, its descendants, Smith & Wesson and Winchester Repeating Arms Company, became major firearms manufactures.
The Volcanic Repeating Arms Company began producing rifles and pistols in early 1856. These weapons used the “Rocket-ball” cartridge that consisted of a bullet with a hollow cavity in the base which contained the powder charge. A priming cap held the powder in place and provided ignition. The ammunition was made in either .31 or .41 calibre and was grossly under powered as muzzle energy was an unimpressive 56 foot pounds. Nevertheless this was an intimidating looking weapon and the precursor to many modern weapons and one of the first self-contained cartridge systems, the type of which is still being experimented with today.
The frame of the Volcanic rifle was made of gunmetal, which is an early form of bronze. Softer than iron, gunmetal was easier to work with and would not rust. Pistols in .31 calibre were made in either 4 or 6 inch barrels holding 6 or 10 rounds, respectively. This example has a 6” barrel. The .41 calibre pistol came with either a 6” or 8” barrel carrying 8 or 10 rounds. A Carbine was produced in 3 barrel lengths–16” holding 20 rounds, 20” holding 25 rounds and 24” holding 30 rounds. The ammunition was held in a tubular magazine beneath the barrel that was loaded from the muzzle end by pivoting the loading sleeve.
Two advantages the Volcanic had was a rapid rate of fire and its ammunition was waterproof. However the “Rocket-ball” ammunition was too underpowered to be considered a hunting weapon or a man stopper except at very close quarter. In addition, the Volcanic design suffered from problems such as gas leakage from around the breech, multiple charges going off at the same time, and misfires. Misfired rounds would have to be tapped out with a cleaning rod as the gun had no means of extraction as there was no case to extract.
Less than 2000 Volcanic pistols were made, and the low survival rate of this iconic weapon puts it into a price category that is beyond most people. This is an opportunity to acquire the next best thing, a copy, and a curiosity at a price 1/20th of what a real Volcanic would cost.

Code: 50620

900.00 GBP


Shortlist item
Superb and rare cased Military Webley Longspur Revolver

A SUPERB CASED 48-BORE JAMES WEBLEY PATENT 'LONGSPUR' (THIRD MODEL) FIVE-SHOT SINGLE-ACTION PERCUSSION REVOLVER RETAILED BY WEBLEY, SERIAL NO. 1374, CIRCA 1854
With blued octagonal sighted barrel muzzle and cut with three groove rifling, blued barrel wedge, case-hardened cylinder engraved with a band of foliage at the front edge and numbered from one to five, border and scroll engraved blued frame signed 'WEBLEY'S PATENT' within a ribbon on the large shaped inspection plate, case-hardened scroll engraved hammer and rammer, the former with chequered spur and the latter with blued retaining-clip, blued border engraved serial numbered grip-strap signed 'BY HER MAJESTY'S ROYAL LETTERS PATENT', blued border and scroll engraved trigger-guard and butt-cap, the latter with lanyard ring, and well figured chequered walnut grips, retaining most of its original finish throughout. Birmingham proof marks, in original fitted military oak case lined in green baize with accessories including a fine Dixon flask, a brass single-cavity 'WD' bullet mould, a combined loading rod and worm with attachable jag, Japanned percussion cap tin with Joyce label, and ivory handled turn-screw and nipple-wrench, original cloth bag of cast bullets and lubricating paste. the exterior with vacant shaped brass escutcheon and brass corner protectors.
The revolver is in fine mechanical order and a complete set of accessories is present. The lanyard ring and military style case would indicate a military purchase. At this time British Officers were required to purchase their own sidearms and this revolver was manufactured at the time of the Crimean War. The bluing is vibrant and contemporary. There is some loss of silver plating on the grip strap and one side plate as indicated and there are two burns on the lid of the case that my gunsmith says could be restored. The flask has some dents but not evident when present in the case. Overall a very attractive, rare and handsome looking set and an iconic revolver for a classic revolver collector.
The Longspur was short lived as the hammer although aesthetic was prone to damage which rendered the revolver inoperable as a single action mechanism.

Code: 50619

8500.00 GBP


Shortlist item
Scarce Colt London Dragoon 3rd Model

This is an interesting and scarce Colt Dragoon with British Proofs that was assembled in Colt's London factory in 1853 and one of only 700 such examples. The story behind the London Dragoon is that Mr Dennet the manager or agent at Colt's Pall Mall office received an enquiry for .44 calibre revolvers and as they were not in production at that time in England, 700 partly made revolvers were quickly shipped in parts and finished and proofed in London. Only 500 were eventually sold and when Colt closed the factory ( after being discovered colluding with the Russians during the Crimean War!! ) the remaining 200 were sent back to the USA to be sold.
This is a 3rd model Dragoon and a decent example as can be seen from the photographs and has a good bore, distinct address and proof marks and is mechanically sound.
A scarce Dragoon!

Code: 50227

Price
on
Request


Huge Adams 38 Bore cased revolver circa 1850.

This huge Adams patent self-cocking or “automatic” Dragoon revolver is in 38 bore (50 Calibre) and features an 8” barrel. These revolvers did not have a spur on the hammer and were fired double action.
The action on this revolver is exceptional and extremely fast, certainly as fast if not faster than a modern double action revolver!
The cased set features all of its accessories including the rare “tailed” mould. These early revolvers were made without a rammer and the bullets were simply pushed into the cylinder by hand and the hope was that the tail or spike behind the bullet would pierce the wad and hold it in place securely. This was not always the case and often the bullets would simply fall out of the cylinder leading to embarrassing or even fatal events. The revolver is in remarkably good condition with much original finish and is marked on the top strap with the makers name and address “Deane Adams & Deane, Makers to HRH Prince Albert. 30 King William Street, London Bridge”.
The revolver is mechanically sound and has good grips with a captive percussion cap container with a hinged lid. The accessories include a James Dixon powder flask, oil bottle, nipple key and turn screw, cleaning rod and oil bottle. There is a small bag of original cast bullets also contained within the box. There is no doubt that this is an original set as the good finish of the accessories matches the finish of the revolver. The English case has a vacant brass roundel in the lid and has its original key for the lock although the lock escutcheon is missing. It is very satisfying to find a complete cased set with the correct mould that has not been messed around with and without the later modification of a rammer addition.
For further and detailed information on this revolver read Taylerson’s seminal work on the subject “Adams revolvers”.

Code: 50618

Reserved


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